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P2Rx™ Topic Hubs

Archived: P2Rx no longer updates this information, but it may be useful as a reference or resource.

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Pollution Prevention for Arts Education: Regulations and Policies
Table of Contents
Background and Overview
Reasons for Change
Health Effects
Regulations and Policies
P2 Opportunities
Consumer Education
Glossary of Terms
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Complete List of Links

Essential Links:

Keeping the Artist Safe: Hazards of Arts and Crafts Materials
This compilation from the National Library of Medicine provides an overview of hazards encountered i...

Concern for healthy and safe schools has recently included art safety policies. Programs are being adopted in many states and communities across the country. A number of state and local policies for school hazards management exist to regulate art materials (including theater, industrial, and visual arts). These can serve as models for other states and school districts. As these examples change, and the numbers of states with school toxic art supply regulations expand, these states will be recognized. Criteria for content will include changes in regulatory legislation as well as media releases and case studies that pertain to ongoing developments in schools at federal, state, and local levels.

In late 2005, Ohio approved Jarod's Law HB 203. This was a response to the accidental death of 6-year-old Jarod Bennett, who lost his life when a 290-pound table toppled over on him. This tragedy led to the formation of HB 203. Key elements of this law are as follows:

  • Creation of the School Health and Safety Network in Ohio
  • Annual school inspections for unsafe health, safety, and sanitation conditions by the Ohio State Board of Health
  • Publicly available published inspection reports for each school
  • Mandatory written plans, including timeframes, for remediation of each item identified as not in compliance by the inspection
  • Review of school?s remediation plans by the Boards of Health to ensure proper compliance with the inspection
  • Auditing and review by State of Ohio Auditor?s Office to ensure overall integrity of Health and Safety Network Program
The following are examples of legislation applicable to school art safety and hazard identification in other states:

California Education Healthy and Safety Code

Title 77 Chapter 1 Subchapter p Part 848: Toxic Art Supplies Code

Rule 410 IAC 6-5.1 Sanitary Schoolhouse Rule

Jarod's Law House Bill Number 203

Hazardous Substances; Radiation Substances Chapter 453 (453.200)

Health and Safety Guide for K-12 Schools in Washington

Individual school districts may also have restrictions on art supplies and safety procedures that apply to their schools. State and local health departments frequently have guidelines found in hazardous materials regulations, but many still lack comprehensive guidelines that specifically apply to arts education programs. Additions to this will continue to occur, and contributions will be welcomed. If you know of new legislation within your state, please feel welcomed to send the links to GLRPPR and this page will be updated.

Public Law 100-695, The Labeling of Hazardous Art Materials Act (LHAMA), requires that all art materials be reviewed to determine the potential for causing a chronic hazard and that appropriate warning labels be put on those art materials found to pose a chronic hazard. Furthermore, LHAMA applies to art materials that are intended for use in the household or by children after November 18, 1990. This legislation established the current standard practices for labeling art materials.

Federal Regulations

Federal legislation for safety regulates hazardous materials and unsafe working conditions.


The Topic Hub™ is a product of the Pollution Prevention Resource Exchange (P2Rx)

The Pollution Prevention for Arts Education Topic Hub™ was developed by:

Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable
Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable
Contact email: glrppr@istc.illinois.edu

Hub Last Updated: 7/31/2009